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Singapore – Ports

The Port of Singapore having collective facilities and terminals, conduct maritime trade handling functions in harbours and which handle Singapore's shipping. Currently the world's second-busiest port in terms of total shipping tonnage, it also trans-ships a fifth of the world's shipping containers, half of the world's annual supply of crude oil, and is the world's busiest transshipment port. It was also the busiest port in terms of total cargo tonnage handled until 2005, when it was surpassed by the Port of Shanghai. Thousands of ships drop anchor in the harbour, connecting the port to over 600 other ports in 123 countries and spread over six continents.

The Port of Singapore is not a mere economic boon, but an economic necessity because Singapore is lacking in land and natural resources. The Port is critical for importing natural resources, and then later re-exporting products after they have been refined and shaped in some manner, for example wafer fabrication or oil refining to generate revenue. The service industries such as hospitality services typical of a port of call restock the food and water supplies on ships. Ships pass between the Indian Ocean and the Pacific Ocean through the Singapore Strait. The Straits of Johor on the country's north are impassable for ships due to the Johor-Singapore Causeway, built in 1923, which links the city of Woodlands, Singapore to Johor Bahru in Malaysia.

 

Port of Singapore :-

The Port of Singapore is the busiest container transhipment hub in the world. Located on the southern end of the Malay Peninsula, about 30km south-west of the Port of Johor in Malaysia, the Port of Singapore offers connectivity to over 600 ports in 123 countries. It is the largest publicly owned port in the world.

The port's Pasir Panjang Terminal is undergoing a $714m expansion. The expansion will add 16 berths with an additional capacity of 14 million twenty-foot equivalent units (TEUs). It will increase the total capacity of the port to around 50 million TEUs.

The facilities and services will allow the port to handle containers and cargo including bulk, break-bulk and project cargo. The port offers a range of services for break bulk and specialised cargoes. The warehouses and open yard spaces are used for storage, packing, consolidation and distribution of cargo. Around 80% of the containers that arrive in Singapore are transhipped to other ports.

The Port of Singapore has conventional and special purpose terminals to handle oil, petroleum and natural gas products as well as cement and steel products. It also has a dedicated car terminal, which is one of the major automotive transhipment hubs in the region.

Other ancillary services include the supply of water and provisions. Pilotage and towage services are also provided.

The port handles around one-fifth of global container transhipment throughput. The terminals handled 25.86 million 20TEUs units of containers, 471.4 million tons of cargo and one million cruise passengers in 2009. A total of 130,575 vessels arrived at the port the same year.

The port facilities include the container terminals, berths, cranes, storage facilities, port information systems, an approach channel and an inter-modal transport system.

The Port of Singapore has terminals at Brani, Keppel, Tanjong Pagar, Pasir Panjang, Jurong and Sembawang. The terminals can handle coasters and lighters, cargo freighters, RO-RO ships, bulk carriers and container vessels.

 

Jurong Port :-

In 1963, Jurong Port was set up by the Singapore Economic Development Board (EDB) to support the growth of Singapore’s first and biggest industrial estate, Jurong Industrial Estate. In 1965, the port officially commenced operations. In 1968, Jurong Town Corporation (JTC) was set up to drive the industrial estate development in Singapore and Jurong Port became a business division under JTC. On January 1, 2001, Jurong Port was corporatized and became a fully owned subsidiary of JTC Corporation.

Jurong Port is an international Multi-Purpose Port Operator operating a General Cargo Terminal, Bulk Cargo Terminal, Container Terminal, Penjuru Terminal and Marina South Wharves for lighter Services, a Small Craft Terminal and mechanical ramps for Roll-On Roll-Off landing crafts. Jurong Port handled about 17.33 million tonnes and 320,000 twenty-foot equivalent units (TEU)s of containers in 2014. Its port facilities are as follows:

·         Total Land Area:155 ha

·         Land Area under Free Trade Zone (FTZ): 127 ha

·         Total Berth Length: 5.6 km

·         Total No. of Berths: 30 + 2 Roll-on Roll-off mechanical ramps

·         Maximum Permissible Draft Alongside: 15.7 m

·         Maximum Vessel Size: 150,000 deadweight tonnes(DWT)

·         FTZ Warehouses: 178,000 m2

·         Non-FTZ Warehouses: 15,000 m2

General cargo terminal :- The General Cargo Terminal handles a diverse range of cargoes including steel products, project cargo, machinery and mechanical appliances. As a transshipment and storage hub accredited by the London Metal Exchange, Jurong Port’s General Cargo Terminal also handles metal ingots.
Bulk cargo terminal :- The Bulk Cargo Terminal handles bulk cargo like bulk cement, furnace slag, copper slag and liquid bulk. Jurong Port has a dedicated common-user facility to handle bulk cement. This Cement Terminal is one of the world’s largest common-user cement facilities and consists of two dedicated berths equipped with three cement screw unloaders linked to a fully enclosed air-slide, non-pollutive conveyor system. Jurong Port handles more than 90% of cement throughput into Singapore.
Container terminal :- Operations started in July 2001. The terminal has an annual handling capacity of 500,000 TEUs. The terminal has a global direct connectivity to over 80 ports in 45 countries.

 

Pasir Panjang Port :-

PSA Singapore operates a total of 60 berths at its container terminals in Tanjong Pagar, Keppel, Brani and Pasir Panjang. They operate as one seamless and integrated facility.

The terminals at Pasir Panjang (PPT) are PSA's most advanced. The berths at PPT Phases 3 and 4 are up to 18 metres deep and equipped with quay cranes able to reach across 24 rows of containers to serve the world's largest container ships. They also feature the latest port innovations - such as a zero-emission, fully-automated electric yard crane system - which raise port productivity, enhance PSA’s ability to manage greater business complexity and create more higher skill-based career opportunities.

Terminals :-

 

Tanjong Pagar Terminal

Facilities

Container berths

7

Quay length (m)

2,100

Area (ha)

80

Max depth at Chart Datum (m)

14.8

Quay Cranes

27

 

Keppel Terminal

Facilities

Container berths

14

Quay length (m)

3,200

Area (ha)

105

Max depth at Chart Datum (m)

15.5

Quay Cranes

37

 

 

Brani Terminal

Facilities

Container berths

8

Quay length (m)

2,400

Area (ha)

84

Max depth at Chart Datum (m)

15.0

Quay Cranes

33

 

Sembawang Terminal

Facilities

Container berths

4

Quay length (m)

660

Area (ha)

28

Max depth at Chart Datum (m)

11.6



 

Pasir Panjang Terminal 1

Facilities

Container berths

6

Quay length (m)

2,174

Area (ha)

88

Max depth at Chart Datum (m)

15.0

Quay Cranes

24

 

Pasir Panjang Terminal 2

Facilities

Container berths

9

Quay length (m)

3000

Area (ha)

113

Max depth at Chart Datum (m)

16.0

Quay Cranes

34

 

Singapore Cruise Center :-

The Singapore Cruise Centre is a cruise terminal located in the south of Singapore in the vicinity of HarbourFront and in Keppel Harbour. Built in 1991 by the then Port of Singapore Authority and upgraded in 1998 by Port of Singapore Authority, it comprises two terminals, namely the International Passenger Terminal (IPT), and the Regional Ferry Terminal (RFT). The Singapore Cruise Centre Pte Ltd took over management of the centre on 1 April 2003 when PSA Corporation divested its non-core businesses.

Today, the centre handles a throughput of over 7 million cruise and ferry passengers a year, of which about 950,000 are cruise passengers.

 

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